CTM Therapy® succeeds in clinical studies

CTM Therapy® has proved its effectiveness in cold therapy in clinical studies. CTM Therapy® is now being used by many leading orthopaedic and trauma hospitals as well as rehabilitation centres. the postoperative clinical pathway has benefited significantly from our treatment concept as a result.

Two important studies – from Ghent University (Belgium) and Ulm University Hospital (Germany) – are now providing tangible, practice-based data on the effectiveness of CTM Therapy® in the postoperative care of total knee replacement and trauma patients.


Study 1: Effectiveness of CTM Therapy® compared to traditional cooling methods after total knee replacement surgery

S. Cornette, A. Van Ostade, N. Mahieu und T. Willems
Ghent University, Belgium

Description

Description

  • The first randomised comparison of CTM Therapy® with standard cooling elements in the care of total knee replacement patients
  • 21 patients per group (42 patients in total)
  • Parameters recorded: pain, functionality, length of stay, mobility and strength

“We observed a significant reduction in pain among patients treated with CTM Therapy®. These patients also reported better functionality after four days – most probably because of the reduction in pain. The patient can also be left by themselves and does not need to be continuously monitored: the system works independently. The length of stay was also shorter for patients using CTM Therapy®. This is an extremely important aspect in reducing costs.”

Dr. Tine Willems
Department of Physical Therapy and Motor Rehabilitation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Ghent University (Belgium)

Design

Design

As part of the study, 21 patients were given CTM Therapy® and 21 patients treated with traditional cooling elements. CTM Therapy® was applied over a period of two hours and at temperatures between 12 – 18 °C on the outstretched knee. The cooling element was wrapped in a sheet and placed on the patient’s outstretched knee without any additional pressure. The temperature of the freezer was -18 °C.

Parameters

Parameters

Pain

Recorded before and after the cryotherapy (days 1 – 4). Scores on the visual analogue scale (VAS) – patient questionnaire to record pain levels; the pain was also measured using the KOOS (knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score) questionnaire.


Functionality

Calculated on day 4 using the KOOS questionnaire


Length of stay

Calculated by subtracting the admission date from the discharge date

Results

Results

Pain

At the beginning of the study (first day post-op), both groups measured similarly severe pain levels. From day 3, patients being treated with CTM Therapy® reported significantly less pain (both before and after the cryotherapy treatment) than patients being treated with the traditional cooling elements (see figures 1A and 1B).

 

Fig. 1: VAS score before (A) and after (B) cryotherapy. The treatment began the day after the operation and lasted for four days.

 

Patients being treated with CTM Therapy® showed signs of a reduction in pain earlier than the patients being treated with traditional cooling elements. In order to further validate the pain levels determined by VAS scores, the KOOS questionnaire was also used to determine the pain levels. Patients being treated with CTM Therapy® reported a significantly higher KOOS score (i.e. a greater reduction in pain) on day 4 of the cryotherapy treatment than patients being treated with traditional cooling elements. 


Functionality

The KOOS value for functionality of activities of daily living (ADL) on day 4 was better among patients being treated with CTM Therapy®, probably due to the greater reduction in pain. (see figure 2)


Length of stay

Patients in the CTM Therapy® group spent an average of 1.5 fewer days in hospital than patients being treated with traditional cooling elements (figure 3). One outlier in each group appeared unsuitable for the analysis and was therefore excluded from this statistic (cooling elements: 40 days; CTM Therapy®: 44 days).

Fig. 2: Average KOOS value for pain and functionality of activities of daily living (on day 4 after cryotherapy). The higher the value, the better the result.

Fig. 3: Length of hospital stay. Patients being treated with CTM therapy had a shorter stay in hospital than those being treated with cooling elements.

Study 2: The efficiency of continuous and temperature-controlled cryotherapy following arthroscopic knee surgery

S. Hausa
Ulm University Hospital, Germany

Description

Description

  • Trauma patients treated with different types of arthroscopic surgery
  • All 62 patients were treated with CTM Therapy®
  • The effects on pain, range of motion, swelling and patient comfort were measured
Design

Design

In the study, 62 trauma patients received a four-hour CTM Therapy® treatment session on the day of their operation (immediately after the surgery) followed by a treatment regimen comprising two two-hour sessions (mornings, afternoons) on two consecutive days (days 1 and 2).

Parameters

Parameters

Pain

A numerical rating scale (NRS) was used to measure pain levels, both before and after the cryotherapy


Range of motion (ROM)

Goniometer for passive flexion and extension before and after the cryotherapy


Swelling

Measurement of the circumference of the thigh, knee and lower leg before and after the cryotherapy


Comfort

Oral assessment of temperature and comfort during the CTM Therapy®

Results

Results

Pain

A significant reduction in pain was observed after the cryotherapy on days 1 and 2 (in the morning and afternoon) (figure 4). The values were calculated using the NRS score. A declining trend in the daily pain levels before the CTM Therapy® was also observed. This would suggest that the treatment has a lasting and prolonged effect on pain and that its effect is not restricted to the period immediately after application. The CTM Therapy® also led to a significant reduction in pain before the start of the second night in hospital (figure 5)

Fig. 4: NRS score before and after the postoperative CTM therapy.

Fig. 5: Pain values during the nights after the surgery.

Range of motion

A significant improvement in the range of motion after the CTM Therapy® was noted on days 1 and 2 (figure 6)


Swelling

Although the swelling increased over the course of the measuring period, there was generally a significant reduction in swelling after the CTM Therapy®. In particular, a significant reduction in the swelling of the thighs was observed on all days (in the morning and afternoon) (figure 7A).

Fig. 6: Degree of extension before and after the postoperative CTM therapy.

Fig. 7A: Swelling of the thigh before and after the postoperative CTM therapy.

All of the measurements for the knee, with the exception of the morning on day 2, were significant (figure 7B). A significant reduction in the swelling of the lower leg was also noted for all of the measurements with the exception of the day of the surgery (figure 7C)

Fig. 7B: Swelling of the knee before and after the postoperative CTM therapy.

Fig. 7C: Swelling of the lower leg before and after the postoperative CTM therapy.

CTM Controller® 1600

A mobile system for the application of CTM Therapy®.

  • Cold and heat treatments in one device
  • Easy and safe to operate
  • Fast provision – no ice needed
  • Uses normal tap water
  • Portable
  • High level of patient comfort
  • Inexpensive

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